September 22, 2014

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  • About the Order of Hsu Yun

    Welcome Message

    We present in these pages "spiritual exercises," thoughts and teachings from a variety of sources, and offer support from a like-minded group of individuals. The Chan path is difficult because it requires that we change ourselves: the way we think, the way we act toward ourselves and others, and even... Read more

    The OHY Mission ...

    The Zen Buddhist Order of Hsu Yun is an international clerical order consisting of individual practitioners, sanghas and practice centers. The Mission of the ZBOHY is: To make the study and practice of Zen Buddhism accessible to the West through approaches that remain in keeping with the classical lineage tradition as... Read more

    Who is Hsu Yun?

    Master Hsu Yun (Empty Cloud) Hsu Yun is unquestionably the most revered Chan Master in China since Hui Neng, the sixth and last Chan (Zen) Patriarch.   Beyond China, a traveler will find shrines, altars and temples in his dedication around the globe. In his unquestionably long lifetime (accounts indicate he may... Read more

    A 2012 Interview with Chuan Zhi

    This interview was conducted on January 27th, 2012, by a visitor to our website who wishes to remain anonymous. Q: Are you the leader of your organization?  If so, what is your role? I am the Abbot of the Order, which means I am the “senior monk”.  Technically, I am no longer... Read more

    Clergy, Spiritual Heads, and Founders

    In May 1998, the Ven. Master Jy Din Shakya, then Abbot of the Hsu Yun temple in Honolulu, Hawaii, organized a dedication ceremony for Hong Fa temple in Shen Zhen, South China, in which 500 monks received full ordination. He invited prominent Zen teachers from around China to give instruction... Read more

    A Biography of Master Jy Din and History of Hsu Yun Temple

    Venerable Master Jy Din Shakya, also known as Wei-miao, was the first official voice of Chinese Chan/Zen to enter the West. He arrived in Hawaii in 1956, by order of his master, the Venerable Hsu Yun (Xu Yun) also known as De-qing and Yan-che. His simple directive to Jy... Read more

    A 2011 Interview with Chuan Zhi

    There is a common myth that it's necessary to have a teacher/guru to make any kind of progress with Zen. What everyone DOES need is inspiration to do this work, because it's not easy, and there are lots of doubts we have along the way (doubt in the sense of... Read more

    Declaration of Faith

    As documented in our corporate non-profit bylaws, our fundamental beliefs are stated as follows: : We each have the ability to seek and to comprehend the Dharma through our own efforts. A primary cause of human suffering is the direct result of our ego's attachments to persons, places, things, and thoughts. The... Read more

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  • Book Reviews

    Book Review: The Yoga Sutra of Patanjali: A Biography

    by Chuan Zhi

    Published Sep 02, 2014

    Book Review: The Yoga Sutra of Patanjali: A Biography

    David Gordon White and Princeton University Press have produced a valuable addition to the literature of Yoga with “The Yoga Sutra of Patanjali: A Biography”.  Rather than adding to the already abundant commentaries available on the subject, White provides us with a contemporary look backward on this quintessential work that... Read more

    Seeing Through Zen: A Book Review

    by Chuan Zhi

    Published Jun 26, 2014

    Seeing Through Zen: A Book Review

    John R. McRae offers a unique and fresh look at the historical development of Chan Buddhism in China with his book, Seeing Through Zen: Encounter, Transformation, and Genealogy in Chinese Chan Buddhism.  While both a Buddhist and a scholar, McRae writes with an easy, fluid, and almost childishly enthusiastic style... Read more

    Book Review: Zen Baggage

    by Chuan Zhi

    Published Jun 27, 2010

    Book Review: Zen Baggage

    Zen Baggage by Red Pine (Bill Porter) ISBN: 1582435405 Have you ever wondered what it would be like to travel through China to discover the historical background of Chinese Zen? Red Pine is the first Westerner to take us on an unprecedented excursion through China to visit the sites we've all... Read more

    Book Review: Zen Shorts by Jon J. Muth

    by Fa Liang, OHY

    Published Oct 08, 2007

    Book Review: Zen Shorts by Jon J. Muth

    MICHAEL! There's a bear outside!" said Karl."A what?" called Michael."A bear. He's really big. And he's in the backyard.""What's he doing?" Michael asked."He's sitting." If you ever wished you had a gentle yet fun way to introduce your family to Zen, look no further than a beautiful children's book: Jon J.... Read more

    The Mind of God - review

    by Chuan Zhi

    Published Jul 17, 2007

    The Mind of God - review

    "The Mind Of God, Human Destiny, Music, and the Search for Meaning Amidst Tragedy" a book review by Chuan Zhi Shakya Enlightenment manifests uniquely in each of us. Instead of seeing reality as made up of parts ­- fragments of thoughts, experiences, and sensations ­- the enlightened mind... Read more

    Zen Ties

    by Fa Liang

    Published Jun 18, 2007

    Zen Ties

    Book Review: Zen Ties by Jon J. Muth Reviewed by Fa Liang The follow-up to "Zen Shorts": "a sequel that doesn’t disappoint"   In his new book "Zen Ties", author and illustrator Jon J. Muth invites us to join Michael, Addy and Karl as they meet Stillwater... Read more

    Answer Your Love Letters

    by Fa Dao Shakya

    Published Jun 12, 2006

    Answer Your Love Letters

    Book Review by Fa Dao Shakya: Answer Your Love Letters: Footnotes To A Zen Practice by Adam Genkaku Fisher A wondrous little book has joined the unofficial canon of “American Zen.” And like most things wondrous and miraculous, it is a pebble that deserves to splash the pond like a... Read more

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  • Dictionaries and Encyclopedias
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  • Family Circle

    Encountering the Spirit of Chan
    A collection of resources for and by children and their families

    There is often a disconnect between our Zen life and our family life.  That's when we need a bridge to connect the two.  Our Family Circle gives you the opportunity to involve your children in the creative arts: visual arts, poetry, stories, and activities. If you have read books to your children that you feel offer helpful "Zen" lessons, or if your children have read some they would like to share, we encourage book reviews from everyone.  

    Poems

    Life is a Dream

    by Yao Feng

    Published Jan 02, 2008

    Life is a Dream

    art and poetry by Rev. Yao Feng Shakya We are all flowers. When the butterfly landsWe let it.When the butterfly departsWe let it.We are a flower. Read more

    Living Zen: An Introduction to Poetry for Kids

    by Fa Liang

    Published Oct 15, 2007

    How do you feel today? What do you see around you? Do you notice anything different, new, or beautiful? Did you know that there is a way to paint a picture of the things you see and the ways you feel using words? One way to paint such a picture is... Read more

    Daily presence / Daily presents

    by Jonathan L., Age 13

    Published Oct 09, 2007

      Dew drops on sweet gumglitter like a thousand jewels;Ev'ry morning's gift. - Jonathan L., Age 13       Read more

    Recess time

    by Josh L., Age 8

    Published Oct 09, 2007

      When I climb a tree,I enter the squirrel's playground.He invites me in.       Read more

    What's out there?

    by Andrew L., Age 8

    Published Oct 09, 2007

      If I sat outside,I would hear birds singing orleaves falling from trees.         Read more

    Stories

    The Story of the Wave

    by Fa Liang

    Published Feb 17, 2008

    The Story of the Wave

    Artwork by Andrew Lively Once upon a time, there was a little wave. The wave loved being a wave  going up and down and playing all day and night. The wave was surrounded by lots of other waves and it had fun watching them, too. Then one day, the little wave noticed... Read more

    Bruno Dreams Ice Cream

    by Zentails

    Published Jan 20, 2008

    Bruno Dreams Ice Cream

      Zen Tails: Bruno Dreams Ice Cream 1.81 MB Read more

    Up and Down

    by Zentails

    Published Jan 20, 2008

    Up and Down

    Zen Tails: Up and Down2.18 MB Read more

    No Presents Please

    by Zentails

    Published Jan 20, 2008

    No Presents Please

      Zen Tails: No Presents Please1.88 MB Read more

    Activities

    The Awareness Game (Ideas for parents of young children)

    by Fa Liang

    Published Oct 17, 2007

    Recently I took my boys outside for a walk. I told them that we'd be talking only about the things we saw, heard, felt, or experienced RIGHT THEN. We wouldn't be talking about other things, only about what was happening right in that moment. At first it was kind of... Read more

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  • Online Journals, Newspapers and Newscasts

    Online Journals, Newspapers and Newscasts

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  • Other Resources
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  • Reading List
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  • Sangha Affiliates

    The Zen Buddhist Order of Hsu Yun is honored to have clerics around the world leading local Zen communities. While the diversity of these groups' approach to Zen training reflects the diversity of their their cultures and languages, it also speaks to the language of Zen, a Buddhist mystical tradition, that does not hold any particular approach to teaching more sacred than any other: as long as the path leads up the mountain, toward the perennial summit, we're golden.

    When we approach a Zen community, or sangha, for the first time we may initially be disquieted by the unfamiliar surroundings, practices, scents, etc. But, ultimately, our ability to embrace a spiritual practice relies on our ability to first put aside our opinions and desires, and to embrace that which is new and different in the same manner we embrace that which is common and familiar.

    There are untold thousands of paths that ascend to the top of the proverbial spiritual summit , but we know well that it is not a matter of which path we take, but that we stay on the path we've chosen (or has been chosen for us). The cornerstone of all Zen Buddhist teachings are the Four Noble Truths. No spiritual training could be simpler ... or more difficult! It is for the difficulty that we have sanghas, for, ideally, they help inspire us onward and help us overcome the many hurdles and obstacles we encounter on the steep climb upward.

    Buddhist sanghas are no more a "closed" community than is a bus carrying a load of passengers. As the bus stops along the way to pick up new passengers who want to share the ride, so do sanghas open their doors to welcome others who wish to share the journey.

    Our affiliate sanghas are open to all who are looking for a community of like-minded seekers. Some of these groups practice in the Japanese Buddhist traditions, some in the Chinese Buddhist traditions, and others in a more "free-form" westernized style. Others mix and match cultural traditions to create a unique blend of approaches. As we say in Zen circles, all approaches are legitimate as long as they serve to propel the devotee in the right direction - that direction that moves us forward and upward toward Zen's summit. We don't argue about which method is best, we just do it. We don't allow our ego to discriminate between one approach and another; we just grab onto one and let it pull us forward.

    The sangha listings here are updated regularly but may occasionally become out-of-date. If you discover any information that is obsolete or otherwise incorrect, please contact the priest whose email address is provided on the respective page.

    Sangha Affiliates of the Order of Hsu Yun are directed by clerical members of the Order of Hsu Yun, as represented by www.hsuyun.org. Sangha Affiliate Directors accept the requirements for Affiliate status which includes:

    * Avoiding copyright infringements
    * Avoiding all forms of plagiarism
    * Complying with local laws and licensure requirements mandated by their local and federal governments
    * Providing guidance and resources to their sangha harmoniously to those presented by the Order of Hsu Yun as represented by www.hsuyun.org
    * Abiding by the Cleric's Code of Ethics as established by the Board of Directors.

    While effort is made to ensure the integrity of the teachings presented by our Sangha Affiliates, the ideas and opinions presented by Affiliate Directors do not necessarily represent those of the ZBOHY as a whole.

    Questions or comments about our Sangha Affiliates or these policies may be directed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .


    Central Coast Zen Centre (Australia)

    by Fa Zhao Shakya

    Central Coast Zen Centre (Australia)

    http://centralcoastzencentre.yolasite.com The Central Coast Zen Centre is located on The Central Coast of NSW - Australia. We are a small community devoted to awakening the heart of wisdom and compassion. Our Sangha has a common commitment to cultivate our practice in our daily lives, in society and in all our... Read more

    Awakening Way Zen (Australia)

    by Fa Gong Shakya

    Awakening Way Zen (Australia)

    Fa Gong Shakya (Finn McMillan) introduces Awakening Way Zen, "A Way Of Intimacy, Awareness and Self-Acceptance" in Melbourne, Australia. Integrating contemporary, scientific, approaches to psychology, with ancient traditions of Chan/Zen practice, Fa Gong offers a unique and easily accessible approach for anyone seeking deeper knowledge of Self. Meetings occur weekly from... Read more

    Mountain Way Zen (United States)

    by Fa Xing Shakya

    Mountain Way Zen (United States)

    Mountain Way Zendo is a practice center for wayfarers from various faiths and walks of life whose spiritual explorations have led them to the practices and teachings of Zen Buddhism. Located in Grays Harbor County of Washington State, USA, and led by resident teacher Fa Xing, the Zendo is... Read more

    Still Water Zendo (United States)

    by Fa Che Shakya

    Still Water Zendo (United States)

    Fa Che Shakya's Still Water Zendo continues to provide weekly meditation sessions and instruction in Tracy Minnesota after it's opening nearly three years ago. If you live in the area and are interested in learning about Zen and the practice of meditation, come any Thursday from 7:00 PM to 8:00... Read more

    Le chant de la vallé (Canada)

    by Fa Tian Shakya

    Le chant de la vallé (Canada)

    Le chant de la vallé is a heritage in Quebec, Canada founded by Fa Tian (Philippe Duchesne). The philosophy is, in his words, that "anybody can awaken here and now to the True Nature with the hearing of only one word. After that, it takes the rest of one's life... Read more

    Empty Cloud Chan Buddhist Group (China)

    by Fa Dong

    Empty Cloud Chan Buddhist Group (China)

    The Empty Cloud Chan Buddhist Group has opened its doors to English-speakers interested in being a part of a Chan sitting group.  Located in Beijing, the group does not follow traditional Chinese customs and rituals but focused directly on Zen practice and study.  For more information, contact Fa Dong Shakya at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.... Read more

    la Fundación del Budismo Zen Gran Loto Blanco (Colombia)

    by Fa Zheng Shakya

    la Fundación del Budismo Zen Gran Loto Blanco (Colombia)

    Presentación de la Fundación del Budismo Zen Gran Loto Blanco Colombia Web Oficial en Colombia   Soy el Rev. Fa Zheng Shakya, Clérigo y Maestro para Colombia de la Orden Hsu Yun del Budismo Chan/Zen y Director de la Fundación del Budismo Zen Gran Loto Blanco. Nuestra trabajo ministerial del Dharma en Colombia se... Read more

    Shi Deng Sangha (Belgium)

    by Fa Chan Shakya

    Shi Deng Sangha (Belgium)

    Come join our sangha. We get together to practice every Wednesday at 8:30pm until 10 pm at the HumanScience Center, 20-22 rue Godefroid, 5000 NAMUR. (Belgium) You may also like to join me for an internet meditation on every sunday at 8pm until 8:45pm on the same internet adress at http://zentv.blog-video.tv/ . Contact... Read more

    Orden Hsu Yun Argentina

    by Fa Di Shakya

    Orden Hsu Yun Argentina

    Lineamientos generales de la sangha y ministerio de Rev. Fa Di Estando en un país de profunda tradición católica, es difícil iniciarse en otra religión. Cuando decidí hace años convertirme al Budismo (pues en la religión católica que heredé de mis padres y abuelos no encontraba ni las respuestas ni el... Read more

    The Sangha at Camagüey (Cuba)

    by Yin Ming Shakya

    The Sangha at Camagüey (Cuba)

    Rev. Yin Ming Shakya, OHY, heads our order's Cuban sangha inCamagüey, Cuba.   Yin Ming, also known as Henry Binerfa Castellanos, is a black belt 4o Dan in Shin Kai Do Ryu, and is a disciple of Rev. Yin Zhi. Rev. Yin Ming incorporates Zen meditation and activities in his classes... Read more

    Dojo Hiramatsu Kan (Venezuela)

    by Fa Yang Shakya

    Dojo Hiramatsu Kan (Venezuela)

    Rev. Fa Yang Shakya inaugurated the first Venezuelan Order of Hsu Yun on Wednesday, January 31, 2008. Rev. Fa Yang offers weekly talks and meditation sessions at Dojo Hiramatsu Kan, San Francisco, Zulia State, Venezuela. Fa Yang is a highly respected Martial Artist in his community and is sought out... Read more

    Order of the Boundless Way (United States)

    by Fa Lohng Shakya

    Order of the Boundless Way (United States)

    Fundamental to the philosophy of Boundless Mind Zen is the recognition that teachers themselves are also students of Zen and that the nature and quality of their teaching is derived from their own understanding and practice. As continuing students, they are committed to an openness and fluidity of teaching and... Read more

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  • Sangha Blogs and Websites
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  • Special Events

    Dharma talks, retreats, trips, and other events of interest to the Dharma community.

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  • Welcome to the Zen Buddhist Order of Hsu Yun

    from Chuan Zhi Shakya

    What is Zen? There is no way to describe in words the nature of the spiritual mind, but be that as it may, those who have encountered it can not help but try, for it's something that moves us in a most profound way. It's natural for us to want to share these experiences with others so that they, too, might share our joy. All world religions offer a mystical path: a path that is outside and beyond our normal, conditioned, modes of thinking and behaving. Buddhism's mystical path is Chan (Zen). It is in the context of both ancient and contemporary teachings that we offer resources and guidance for those interested in learning more about Chan Buddhism.

    Chan defies definition, but we can say that it was dominanty the result of the blending of Indian Buddhism and Chinese Taoism.  While each of these mystical traditions are infinetly complex systems when studied empirically, Chan becomes infinitely simple when applied directly to our lives.  Perhaps ironically, there is nothing to teach when it comes to Chan because the knowledge of Chan is within each of us: all we can do is point a seeker in the direction that he or she can find it within themselves. Spiritual authority comes only from within.

    hotoi-pointing-to-moonWe present in these pages "spiritual exercises," thoughts and teachings from a variety of sources, and offer support from a like-minded group of individuals. The Chan path is difficult because it requires that we change ourselves: the way we think, the way we act toward ourselves and others, and even the way we feel about things. In short, we must "undo" ourselves to discover who we truly are ... underneath who it is we think we are. It requires vigilance, devotion, and, perhaps most importantly, faith -- faith that we, ourselves, hold the ultimate answer that our inner beings seek. As Hotei points to the moon we ask our selves what is his message? Is it the moon? Is it the Finger? It is neither. What is it?

    In the Chan teaching tradition, "anything goes" as long as it serves to point the seeker in the right direction and causes no harm. A novice to Chan may initially be uncomfortable with the lack of firm rules and regulations, dogmas and belief-structures that Chan historically has regarded as dangerous to spiritual development; however, complete freedom of Self is the ultimate goal of Chan and this relies on our growing ability to discard attachments to all forms of structured thought and action.

    The Order of Hsu Yun Website offers a wide variety of materials for those interested in learning about Chan, from poetry and art, to essays by our clergy and visitors, traditional Mahayana scriptures, chants and prayers, selected writings from spiritual teachers of other religious traditions, and more. In the spirit of Chan, we always welcome your feedback, questions, and comments.

    I hope you find something of value in the writings and other works presented here.

    chuanzhi_chopMay the Infinite Light shine eternally, and may we all come to realize our fundamental inter-connectedness with each other, and all that is.

    - Chuan Zhi

    History and Background of OHY

    by Fa Dao Shakya

    Founding of the Order

    The Zen (Chan) Buddhist Order of Hsu Yun (ZBOHY) was founded on November 8, 1997 by Grandmaster Jy Din Shakya, Abbot and founder of Hsu Yun Temple in Honolulu. The event coincided with an ordination ceremony in which he named Chuan Zhi Shakya after himself, a rare honor bestowed to a disciple. The subsequent year, in May 1998, Grandmaster Jy Din escorted Rev. Chuan Zhi to China where he received full ordination in a month-long ceremony at Hong Fa temple. At the end of the ceremony, Chuan Zhi was entered into the ledgers of the International Buddhist Registry as Abbot of The Zen Buddhist Order of Hsu Yun (Hsu Yun Chan Yuan: 虛 雲 禪 苑).

    Grandmaster Hsu Yun

    Master Hsu Yun is considered the most famous Chinese Chan (Zen) master of the 20th Century in China and other parts of the world.  He is known best for his tireless effort at spreading the Dharma during his exceptionally long life.

    According to the sparse records available, Hsu Yun was born in approximately 1839 in Guangzhou province. In his youth he enjoyed reading about Chan Buddhism and it was during his teen years that he decided to enter monastic life despite strong family opposition. He was ordained at Gu Shan temple in 1859 by Grandmaster Miao-lian at age 20.

    During his long lifetime, Hsu Yun traveled throughout China and Southeast Asia giving lectures and assisting with intensive Chan practice retreats. His passion, bringing Chan to the forefront of consciousness in China, led him to the restoration of numerous monasteries and temples that had fallen into extensive disrepair, many abandoned due to aging and lack of interest. Among these was Nan Hua temple, founded by the Sixth Patriarch, Hui Neng. Hsu Yun not only rebuilt and revitalized this famous temple; he founded a religious school on the grounds to teach Buddhism, as well as a primary school to help provide for the many young children of the region who would otherwise have had poor, or no, education.

    Grandmaster Hsu Yun died in October of 1959, at Zhen Ru monastery. By available accounts, he was 120 years old.
     

    More about Hsu Yun's teachings can be found here.  

    Grandmaster Jy Din Shakya

    Grandmaster Jy Din Shakya was born on November 17, 1917 to a wealthy business family in China. He survived both the Japanese invasion of China in World War II and the later Chinese Communist attacks on religious activities. During a visit in 1934 to Nan Hua Monastery, Jy Din first met Master Hsu Yun: "Something happened to me when I looked into his face," he wrote later, "I suddenly dropped to my knees and pressed my forehead to the ground, kowtowing to him. My friends were all astonished. I had never kowtowed to anybody in my life."

    After much encouragement from Master Hsu Yun to become a monk at the temple, he was ordained at Nan Hua Monastery in 1937. Jy Din was to become Hsu Yun's translator as he later traveled throughout China teaching Chan Buddhism.

    In 1949, Master Jy Din was directed by Hsu Yun to move to Hawaii to establish a Buddhist temple for the many Chinese immigrants who had moved there. By 1956 enough money was raised to build a traditional Chinese-style temple at 42 Kawananakoa Place in Honolulu. Master Jy Din named it the Hsu Yun Temple after his beloved master.

    After decades of service to the local Chinese ethnic population of Hawaii, Master Jy Din recognized the self-limiting nature of a temple that, by it's Chinese ethnic nature, effectively excluded non-Chinese ethnic populations.

    In the 1990's he became aware of the power of the Internet as a means to spread the teachings of Buddhism to other parts of the world. In 1998 he elevated his disciple and heir, Chuan Zhi, to Abbot of the Order of Hsu Yun and included a mandate that the order continue its online presence for the promotion and study of Zen.

    Master Jy Din passed away at 85 years of age on March 13, 2003, after a long and difficult illness. Jeanne Lum, a member of the Temple Board said of him: "His major principle was to accept things. And he never complained, never scolded or got angry at anyone, and always believed that if you would just do kindness to a bad person the person gradually would change." Leadership of the Hsu Yun temple was passed on to Master Fa Wai Shakya.
     

    A biographical account of the life of Master Jy Din can be found here.

    Chuan Zhi Shakya

    Chuan Zhi was born on October 12, 1960 in Lafayette, Indiana, United States. He received his undergraduate degree in Physics in 1983 and spent the following two years teaching mathematics and physics in Bogotá, Colombia. Upon returning to the United States, he continued his education in Physics at Purdue University before joining the workforce as an experimental physicist in 1986. After a long fascination with Zen Buddhism he became ordained under Grandmaster Jy Din Shakya (November 8, 1997). Chuan Zhi received ordination at Hong Fa temple in China in 1998 under Grandmasters Jy Din, Ben Huan, Shou Ye and others.
     

    Master Fa Hui Shakya

    Master Fa Hui was ordained by Master Chuan Ying Shakya on August 15th, 1945, the day Japan surrendered to the Western Allies, ending the war in the Pacific. He became Abbot of Hsu Yun Temple shortly before the passing of Grandmaster Jy Din and has been instrumental in the ongoing evolution of ZBOHY.

    When asked if he would like to give a message to the ZBOHY community he replied: "People must be careful: once you enter the Chan path, do not let yourself go off in another direction. Stay on the Path. Many people think that by switching to other paths, or by mixing different paths together, they will attain Buddhahood faster and more easily. It doesn't work that way. Follow a straight course and don't take turns that lead away from Chan. Keep your practice simple, and keep your practice strong. Be kind to people and don't get involved in conflicts."

    Lineage

    Hui Neng, the Sixth and last Patriarch of Chan, founded his order in 675 AD at his monastery which he named Bao Lin Ji. It latter came to be known as Nan Hua Si. This historic temple is located roughly 100 miles north of Guang Zhou on the Caoxi Little River. Through a succession of Dharma Heirs, the lineage to Hui Neng continues through many branches around the world. According to documented Chinese records, Master Hsu Yun was 54 generations from Hui Neng and his heir, Jy Din, was 55th generation. [The lineage sequence is contained in a poem which lists, in chronological sequence, Dharma names given from master to disciple. Once the list has been completed, it returns to the beginning and repeats. For example, Jy (Zhi) gives the first name "Chuan" (56th generation), Chuan gives the name "Fa" (57th generation), Fa gives the name "Yin" (58th generation), and Yin gives the name "Zheng" (59th generation). For a look into the value and pitfalls of the lineage system, read Rev. Chuan Zhi's essay series, Western Zen: Transition and Turmoil.]

    Disclaimer

    The Zen Buddhist Order of Hsu Yun (ZBOHY) under the guidance of Rev. Chuan Zhi Shakya is represented on the www.hsuyun.org and www.xuyun.org websites and is not associated with other groups or websites that might represent themselves as ZBOHY in the United States or other countries unless acknowledged as affiliated groups on our website. Because of our mandate to abstain from political agendas, ZBOHY is also not associated with the Fa Lun Gong or other religious-political groups outlawed in China or elsewhere.

    Individual opinions expressed by clergy of ZBOHY do not necessarily reflect those of ZBOHY as a whole, the Board of Directors, or the Founders or Spiritual Heads of the Order.

    Questions regarding the Order should be directed to our board of directors by writing to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
     

    A note on word Usage: "Zen" or "Chan"?

    "Zen" and "Chan" are both cognates of the term Dhyana, meaning "to dwell" or to meditate. Zen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese character Chan. Since the term, Zen, was the first to make its way to the west, it is more universally used. For this reason, ZBOHY uses the two terms interchangeably.
     

    Chinese terms

    Chinese Pinyin spellings (the contemporary Chinese standard) are used in preference to Wade Giles spellings now found almost exclusively in Taiwan. Even with the pinyin standard, Chinese words are often spelled differently depending on the time and location of origin and local dialect; therefore, there may arise discrepancies in spellings of names and locations with other literature.
     

    Final note

    Ultimately, the practice and study of Chan is both a personal pursuit and a sangha (community) pursuit. It is not the intention of ZBOHY to demand strict conformity of practice. Rather, it is our goal to present classical and contemporary Chan teachings, methods and principles in the Western idiom as a guide to those wending their own way along the Path.

    It is our purpose and intention to present the teachings of the Hsu Yun/Lin Chi lineage in a way that makes them readily accessible and understandable to Western Practitioners. It is our hope to offer the benefit of an international sangha to our affiliated groups and lone seekers alike.

    We humbly offer that which we have been given -- modern western understandings and approaches to the Dao of the classical Southern Chan masters.

    Namo Amotofo
    Rev. Fa Dao Shakya, Director, OHY  

     

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